AldeburghPast&Present

a one-place study

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© Sharon White, AldeburghPast 2014-2016

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The Three Mariners Inn, Slaughden c.1907

Slaughden

W.A. Dutt, in 1909, described Slaughden as a ‘small, sea-threatened cluster of cottages bordering a primitive quay and grouped around an ancient inn with a huge bone of a whale suspended over its front door’.

There is a display in the Moot Hall headed ‘The Last Days of Slaughden’ and which states:

The village of Slaughden became more important as ships got larger and the river Hundred at thorpe Ness silted up. As an alternative to the Thorpe haven, Slaughden Quay became Aldeburgh’s “River Side”.

By 1674, it had superceded Dunwich as a port. In its heyday there were twenty houses, a pub, warehouses, a fish curing-salt store and a soap factory.

By the late 19th Century Slaughden was under serious threat from the sea.

Note: The display includes the postcard image above and includes the caption “The Three Mariners finally succumbs to the sea c.1910”. However, the Three Mariners inn was still in place at the time of the census in 1911 and the postcard image is believed to date from c.1907. The Three Mariners did not renew its licence in 1918 which suggests 1917/18 may be more likely as the date when it finally succumbed.




Click here for information on The Ionia

We are grateful to Alec Burwood who provided this image of Slaughden - the Three Mariners Inn is to the far left of the picture.

A view of Slaughden

A closer view of Slaughden

We are grateful to Alec Burwood who also provided this close-up image of Slaughden - the Three Mariners Inn is once again on the far left of the picture.

Slaughden & The Three Mariners Inn - by James William Booth R.A.

We are grateful to Ray Norman who provided this image of an original oil painting, by James William Booth R.A. (1867-1953), that he purchased at an auction in Germany.

Sea encroachment

The Times of Saturday 10 January 1925 included the image (left) with the caption:

SEA ENCROACHMENT at Aldeburgh, Suffolk, where the sea has crept up tp houses which were occupied during the war. They have now been abandoned.

The Three Mariners Inn, Slaughden ‘taken in a gale’